Weekend Reading

I started Careers For Women by Joanna Scott last night and am really into it. I didn’t get very far but far enough to know it’s going to be a good book! I absolutely love novels that take place in New York City during previous decades and this one is set in

Here’s what you need to know:

In the Public Relations Department of the New York Port Authority in 1958, Maggie Gleason is one of several extraordinary young women learning from the legendary Lee Jaffe. A renowned publicist in a man’s world, Lee tries to show her charges that despite the obstacles in their way, they can lead fulfilling, successful lives. But when she takes Pauline Moreau and her daughter Sonia under her wing, no one can foresee the deadly consequences of a secret from the past that Pauline can’t escape no matter how hard she tries. What Maggie discovers in the wake of Pauline’s mysterious disappearance upends everything she thought she knew about work, love, family, and ambition. 

I’d been in a bit of a reading slump so I was so happy when I was pulled into this book from page one!

I am building up to read this because it sounds creepy and maybe a little scary! Bring Her Home by David Bell . People are saying its “outstanding” and “gripping” and “shocking” which are all the words I like regarding a suspenseful novel!

Here’s the synopsis:

Just a year and a half after the tragic death of his wife, Bill Price’s fifteen-year-old daughter, Summer, and her best friend, Haley, disappear. Days later, the girls are found in a city park. Haley is dead at the scene, while Summer is left beaten beyond recognition and clinging to life.

As Bill holds vigil over Summer’s bandaged body, the only sound the unconscious girl can make is one cryptic and chilling word: No. And the more time Bill spends with Summer, the more he wonders what happened to her. Or if the injured girl in the hospital bed is really his daughter at all.

When troubling new questions about Summer’s life surface, Bill is not prepared for the aftershocks. He’ll soon discover that both the living and the dead have secrets. And that searching for the truth will tear open old wounds that pierce straight to the heart of his family.

I am reading this one soon. It’s out right now so you can find it on Amazon or where ever you like to buy your books!

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Another book that is available is this highly rated novel All The Best People by Sonja Yoerg.  This book is well written and beautifully paced. I always admire writers who can infuse their stories with emotion and you feel the character’s pain and joy.

Vermont, 1972. Carole LaPorte has a satisfying, ordinary life. She cares for her children, balances the books for the family’s auto shop and laughs when her husband slow dances her across the kitchen floor. Her tragic childhood might have happened to someone else.

But now her mind is playing tricks on her. The accounts won’t reconcile and the murmuring she hears isn’t the television. She ought to seek help, but she’s terrified of being locked away in a mental hospital like her mother, Solange. So Carole hides her symptoms, withdraws from her family and unwittingly sets her eleven-year-old daughter Alison on a desperate search for meaning and power: in Tarot cards, in omens from a nearby river and in a mysterious blue glass box belonging to her grandmother.

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I savored The Stranger In The Woods partly due to author Michael Finkel’s fantastic writing and also because the story is so compelling. Immediately I was reminded of Into The Wild by Jon Krakauer which is another book that hit me right in the heart and stayed with me long after I closed the cover.

Not quite a hermit, I am very introverted and like being alone, I get flustered when I am around people and only feel totally comfortable in my own home, so I can understand a tiny bit of what Christopher McKnight must have felt when he ventured into the Maine woods… and didn’t come out for 27 years.

Solitude, enjoying the beauty of the woods, not worrying about anyone or anything, no pressure of the daily grind, it’s not hard to see the appeal. While there is nothing so healing as nature,  it’s hard to imagine spending decades not uttering a single word or communicating with another human. I can spend a few hours in nature, exploring, taking photos, and then I need to come back to my family and dogs. Christopher, however, never needed to enter back into society.

This story is unbelievable, sad, interesting,  and I couldn’t put it down.

In 1986, a shy and intelligent twenty-year-old named Christopher Knight left his home in Massachusetts, drove to Maine, and disappeared into the forest. He would not have a conversation with another human being until nearly three decades later, when he was arrested for stealing food. Living in a tent even through brutal winters, he had survived by his wits and courage, developing ingenious ways to store edibles and water, and to avoid freezing to death.

He broke into nearby cottages for food, clothing, reading material, and other provisions, taking only what he needed but terrifying a community never able to solve the mysterious burglaries. Based on extensive interviews with Knight himself, this is a vividly detailed account of his secluded life–why did he leave? what did he learn?–as well as the challenges he has faced since returning to the world. It is a gripping story of survival that asks fundamental questions about solitude, community, and what makes a good life, and a deeply moving portrait of a man who was determined to live his own way, and succeeded.

Based on extensive interviews with Knight himself, this is a vividly detailed account of his secluded life–why did he leave? what did he learn?–as well as the challenges he has faced since returning to the world. It is a gripping story of survival that asks fundamental questions about solitude, community, and what makes a good life, and a deeply moving portrait of a man who was determined to live his own way, and succeeded.