angelina-jolie-300

When Angelina Jolie stepped up and talked about her mutated BRCA1 gene and her preventive mastectomy, people sat up and took notice. The dialogue about breast cancer really opened up and everyone had an opinion, good or bad. I think the decision to be tested is a highly personal one.

YOU are in charge of your health, the decisions surrounding your health and how you are going to live your life. Be informed, take the time to educate yourself. Invest in yourself.

Having had both grandmothers diagnosed with  breast cancer, a grandfather who had lung cancer, a mother who had breast cancer, this is a really important issue to me. When I started reading about cancer causing chemicals and toxins in beauty products, this became not only an interest but a way of life to benefit my health long term.

“I’ve been very happy just to see the discussion about women’s health expanded and that means the world to me. After losing my mom to these issues, I’m very grateful for it and I’ve been very moved by the support from people,” said Angelina {People.com}. 

This weekend I watched Pink Ribbons Inc. Its a fascinating documentary about the business of breast cancer. Billions of dollars have been raised through companies like Susan G. Komen and Avon but where is the money going? How come we aren’t closer to finding a cure? How about prevention, why isn’t that as mainstream as wearing a pink ribbon? Where is the research for environmental causes of cancer? Does carcinogens in beauty products and personal care products incease the odds of getting cancer in one’s lifetime?

  

   “In the U.S., major loopholes in federal law allow the cosmetics industry to put thousands of synthetic chemicals into personal care products, even if those chemicals are linked to cancer, infertility or birth defects. At the same time as untested chemicals have been steadily introduced into our environment, breast cancer incidence has risen dramatically.” {source}

Every October, hundreds of companies bring out their pink ribbon products, donating a penny or maybe a dollar per product sold. Beauty companies who make these products with known carcinogens are selling these items for breast cancer awareness? Okay, we’re aware. But now that we are all aware of breast cancer…what next?

  

  Instead of spending hundreds of dollars on these pink ribbon products, how about talking about prevention? You can start by reducing your risks. Click here to go to the Breast Cancer Funds Tips for Prevention.

For your beauty routine:

Simplify 

Some beauty products contain carcinogens and hormone-disrupting chemicals. Decrease your exposure by using fewer products with simpler ingredients.

Avoid “fragrance”

 “Fragrance” can contain dozens, even hundreds, of chemicals—including hormone disrupting phthalates. Avoid synthetic fragrance and opt for products that are fragrance-free or contain natural fragrances like essential oils.

Ingredients to avoid

 Avoid products with DMDM hydantoin and imidazolidinyl urea; parabens or any word ending in “-paraben”; “PEG” and words ending in “-eth”; triclosan and triclocarban; triethanolamine (TEA); hydroquinone and oxybenzone.

Products to avoid

 Anti-aging creams with lactic, glycolic, AHA or BHA acids.  Hair dyes, especially dark permanent dyes. Nail polish and removers with formaldehyde, DBP or toluene. Skin lighteners with hydroquinone.

If this is a topic of interest to you, head over here for some more interesting reading.  I could write about this all day long and talk about it too.

I’ve been reviewing various beauty products for years and  years and only lately have seen the connection between cancer and the chemicals in beauty and personal care products. It very eye-opening and upsetting. And it’s why I’ve switched to natural and organic products and I encourage you to consider doing the same.